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    Cine Design Training

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Learn how to visualize camerawork and lighting in 3D

  • Cine Design Training - Adobe Fuse Characters: Realistic Eye Light and PBR Skin Shader in Cinema 4D Adobe Fuse Characters: Realistic Eyes and Skin in Cinema 4D

    Realistic humans are important for Cine Design so our lighting “reads” correctly to the director. In this episode we take Adobe Fuse characters and make them more realistic by adding eyes lights and a realistic skin material.

    Adobe Fuse Characters: Realistic Eyes and PBR Skin

    When you create your Adobe Fuse character, make sure you export the highest resolution texture maps

    When you are tweaking the textures of your final Adobe Fuse character you can choose what “resolution” you want the texture maps to be. It’s very important to choose 2K for the skin and 1k+ for the clothing and accessories. The more detail and resolution you have in those maps, the easier it will be to make the Fuse character look realistic in Cinema 4D.
     

    Delete the Materials that come with the Fuse FBX File

    These default materials have some problems with them, so start from scratch and create a new material for the body, tops, bottoms, eyes(default), and eye lashes. Follow the video for reconnecting the diffuse/color texture maps.
     

    Add Lenses to the Eyes To Catch Reflections aka add eye lights

    To create realistic eye lights you need to create spheres that act as lenses around each eye. Then you need to create a materials that is transparent (glass) and reflective. The reflectance channel will be setup for you after you activate the transparency channel and choose the “Glass” preset. Make sure to delete the default Reflectance layer.
     

    Add Reflectance to the Skin aka make it shiny

    Start by adding a Beckmann layer to the reflectance channel of the skin. Then turn on the Fresnel and set it to Dielectric 1.45. The strength of the reflection and the specular will determine how bright the reflections will be. The “Bluriness” will determine how defined the reflections will be. I suggest starting at 50-60%, then going higher or lower depending on how “wet” you want the skin to look. It really depends on the lighting and environment as it’s essentially a reflection.
     

    Add the normal maps to the skin and clothes aka add detail

    The final step for our “simple” PBR materials will be to add some fine details using the normal maps generated by Adobe Fuse. On the body the normal maps make the belly button, clavicle, and face more defined. This is a modern approach to keeping the base model low poly but the final render appear high poly. They don’t affect the performance that much either.

    If you want to continue towards the uncanny valley, learn more about Subsurface scattering and using bump/displacement maps to add more fine skin detail like skin pores etc. You can also check out tools like Substance Designer and Substance painter to add dirt and unevenness to the stock skin shader.

    In the next episode we’ll be adding realistic hair using the Cinema 4D hair object.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • Set Designer Preview Set Designer Preview

    In this episode we take a look at the beginnings of a new plugin we are creating that is going to allow you to quickly design and visualize real world sets in 3D. This plug-in is designed for professional production designers, art directors, but of course can be used by directors and cinematographers.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • Cine Designer R1 Build 2 What's New What’s New in Build 2 of Cine Designer R1

    In this episode we look at the new models and features in Cine Designer R1 Build 02!

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • Physical Render: How To Visualize Daylight Interior in Cinema 4D Physical Render: Visualizing Interior Daylight in Cinema 4D

    In this episode of Cine Design Training, we cover some of the advanced settings in Physical Render. If you are having trouble with “Blotchy” or “Grainy” shadows, this video will guide you through the steps to optimizing those results. We also cover how to use the “Sky” and “Sun” objects to accurately visualize a DAY INTERIOR scene that is lit by a single window.

    The concepts and techniques covered in this Cinema 4D tutorial will allow you to quickly and beautifully render daylight scenes for your Cine Design work. This is a very common scenario, so mastering this process is essential.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • how to texture a SketchUp model in Cinema 4D How to Texture a SketchUp Model in Cinema 4D

    In this episode of Cine Design Training, we cover how to texture a 3D model of a car downloaded from the SketchUp 3D Warehouse. The model comes in out of scale, so we look up the real world car’s height and match the model to that. Next we start to figure out where the texture issues are on the model. We clean up each piece of “problem” geometry and create an appropriate material for it. There are usually a lot of groups in a SketchUp model, but if you spend some time you can organize it and you will have a nice looking model that was free!

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • How to make things look realistic in Cinema 4D Materials 101: How to Make Things Look Realistic in Cinema 4D

    In this episode of Cine Design Training, we cover how to make objects look realistic in Cinema 4D. We breakdown the basics of creating materials for a flat paint, chrome ball, shiny paint, rubber, and glass. We’ll use our knowledge of Materials in Cinema 4D to texture a realistic car in the next episode.

    If you are brand new to 3D this will be a challenging episode, but stick with it and follow along. If you need to watch this video several times, do it! This is really important if you want your Cine Design renders to look realistic.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • How to use Adobe Fuse characters in Cinema 4D How to Use Adobe Fuse Characters in Cinema 4D

    In this episode of Cine Design Training, we cover how to create 3D character in Adobe Fuse. We then import it to the Mixamo Auto-Rigger which saves you the hassle of adding bones and skinning your characters. We download our FBX file from Mixamo and import it into Cinema 4D. The textures come in a little off, so we fix those. Finally we look at how to pose the character by directly rotating the joints/bones.

    Adobe Fuse characters are free if you are an Adobe Creative Cloud member. They look great in Cinema 4D and we really recommend you using them for Cine Design.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • Where to Find 3D Models 3D Scan Store Where to Find 3D Models: 3D Scan Store

    In this episode of Cine Design Training, we cover how to find incredibly realistic 3D models of humans from 3DScaneStore.com! We love using 3D scan data because the human models look incredibly realistic. This helpful when judging lighting and selling the Cine Design process in general.

    Head over to 3D Scan Store and pick up a realistic 3D model for your Cine Design studies and work.

    3DScaneStore.com

    Cheers,

    Matt

  • Where to find 3D Models Turbo Squid Where to Find 3D Models: Turbo Squid

    In this episode of Cine Design Training, we cover how to search and find professional paid 3D models from Turbo Squid. These models are high quality and we recommend investing in them if you are planning a large commercial. Cars and product Cine Design will benefit greatly from using high quality realistic 3D models from Turbo Squid.

    TurboSquid.com

    Cheers,

    Matt